Celebrating 20 Years as Second Generation Owners

Bud Miller, Mike Miller, Deb Miller, Jessica Miller August 2016

In November 1997, Michael and Deb Miller had just started their family in Los Angeles. At that time Michael’s father, Bud Miller, was considering retirement after 46 years in business as the owner of Miller’s Diamond Jewelry, and Michael and Deb agreed to move back to Mansfield to help liquidate the business.

“After working in the store alongside his father for a couple of months, Mike realized how much he enjoyed working in the business. Mike and Bud began talks about Mike purchasing the business, and shortly thereafter the sale was concluded. It gave both if us great joy to assist his father in his goal to retire, and carry on the family business,” reflects Deb Miller.

Two decades later, the Miller family is still proudly at the helm of Miller’s Diamond Jewelry, a family-owned jewelry store that has thrived for 66 years in Mansfield because of their quality products and expert jewelers.

“Running a family business in Mansfield has allowed us to both be very present parents, something not possible for us in the NYC or LA areas,” share the Millers, whose son Kyle and daughter Jessica are now both in college.

The past two decades have not been without changes to the store. In 2005, the Millers decided to relocate the business from its original location on the square in Downtown Mansfield to the Appleseed Center in 2005. Mike Miller is also known for his role as President and CEO of the Renaissance Performing Arts Association. Today, he splits his time between the two positions and Deb manages the day-to-day operations of the store.

“Like Mike, it didn’t take long for me to realize how enjoyable it was to be in the business, and how important was the services we provide the community,” shares Deb Miller.

When asked about the highlights of twenty years of small business ownership in Mansfield, both Mike and Deb Miller warmly reflected on the patronage of the local customers, saying, “We regularly see customers who purchased jewelry 20 years ago or more. The quality pieces they purchased are still providing them joy these many years later, or are being passed down for generations. So often our customers say they wouldn’t shop anywhere else, for the quality, service, and sense of belonging to our ‘Miller Family’ they have, and continue to receive, throughout the generations.”

The Millers attest their customer loyalty to their business’ commitment to quality since its inception. “Every week we see people who purchased items elsewhere, at chain store or online, for example, and the pieces were constructed poorly, repaired poorly, or misrepresented. The most common thing we hear from them is ‘I should have gone to Millers!’ And we’re glad when they do.”

The Timeless Diamond

Luxury Diamonds

The most coveted of the birthstones, the diamond is the gemstone for April birthdays. It’s almost a cliché to say that “diamonds are forever,” but when we think about timeless gemstones the diamond is always the first to come to mind. Diamonds were formed between 1-3 million years ago in the earth’s mantle, then thrust to the surface of the earth through volcanic vents.

Diamonds are prized for their ability to refract light into a rainbow of colors, which jewelers refer to as, “fire.” Another key element to the diamond’s timelessness is its ability to sparkle when hit with the light, which jewelers refer to as “scintillation.” An expert cut creates a number of visual effects in the light, which is one reason why diamonds are so cherished by every generation.

While one of the hardest gemstones (with a 10 on the Mohs hardness scale!), it is a common misconception that diamonds are unsusceptible to harm. In spite of their strength, diamonds can chip or crack, which is one reason why it’s important to regularly check in with a qualified local jeweler.

“Wearing your fine jewelry appropriately can extend its life. It is important to remove jewelry during high-risk activities such as exercising, gardening, cooking and swimming, during which gemstones can become chipped or loose in their settings.

“Because they are so hard, when diamonds become loose in their settings, they can actually cut through the metal holding them in place. Regular examinations by a qualified local jeweler can help detect problems early, and prevent gemstone loss. More importantly, purchasing quality jewelry is the first step toward ensuring lasting value. A well-built mounting will hold and protect your gemstones for years,” says Deb Miller, owner of Mansfield’s Miller’s Diamond Jewelry.

As “engagement season” and summer weddings fast approach, many brides and grooms will select diamond rings to represent the timelessness of their love as they make a lifetime commitment to each other, and their choice is based in truth.

Diamonds have played an important part in numerous cultures for thousands of years. As early as the fourth century BC, the diamond trade began in India, making it to Western Europe in the 1400s. Diamonds and other gemstones have been held in high regard by numerous cultures, believed to provide the wearer strength and to carry healing properties. In the first century AD, Roman naturalist Pliny the Elder stated, “Diamond is the most valuable, not only of precious stones, but of all things in this world.”

Regardless of whether celebrating an April birthday, making a lifetime commitment, or treating someone for Mother’s Day, a diamond is a truly timeless way to declare your love.

Ring Sizes

Engagement Ring SizeNot sure about your ring size? There is an easy way to determine your ring size.

Materials needed:

  • a piece of string
  • a marker
  • a ruler with mm or millimeter markings on it

Wrap the string around the largest part of your finger, this in most cases is the base of the finger in which you want to wear the ring, however in some cases this is the knuckle above where you want the ring. Mark the string where it meets on your finger and measure it with the ruler, make sure to measure it using the mm or millimeter settings.

Want to buy a ring as a gift and you are not sure of the size. Sneak a ring that you know fits and slide it over a tapered candle. follow the directions above and measure the candle where the ring stops on the candle.

Tip: finger sizes can change during the course of the day. To ensure the best fit measure your finger at the end of the day. Or measure a couple of times during the day and order your ring in the largest size that you measured.

Ring Size Inches Millimeter
1/2 15/32 11.95
1 31/64 12.37
1 1/2 1/2 12.78
2 33/64 13.21
2 1/2 17/32 13.61
3 35/64 14.05
3 1/2 9/16 14.45
4 37/64 14.86
4 1/2 19/32 15.27
5 5/8 15.7
5 1/2 41/64 16.1
6 21/32 16.51
6 1/2 43/64 16.92
7 11/16 17.35
7 1/2 45/64 17.75
8 23/32 18.19
8 1/2 47/64 18.53
9 3/4 18.89
9 1/2 49/64 19.41
10 25/32 19.84
10 1/2 51/64 20.2
11 13/16 20.68
11 1/2 53/64 21.08
12 27/32 21.49
12 1/2 55/64 21.89
13 7/8 22.33

Independent Jewelers Organization

What is the IJO?

Starting in 1972, the Independent Jewelers Organization has become the largest buying group in the world. From its’ modest beginnings with 52 members, the company has grown to over 850 members worldwide.

IJO’s purchasing clout enables us to negotiate the best prices from more than 150 top suppliers in the industry. These savings are passed on to you.

The Independent Jewelers Organization offers its members extensive buying opportunities, allowing them to bring the top fashions and best prices to you.

IJO also allows members to buy directly from the cutters through their offices in the famous city of Antwerp, Belgium, the diamond capital of the world.

Master IJO Jewelers are full service jewelers with knowledgeable staff who will educate and guide you through your purchase either online or at the store.

“Independent” means we are long term residents of the community, involved in local issues, charities and events. We are not chain stores operated from offices outside the community.

IJO Members consistently meet the high standards of excellence, service and integrity required by the Independent Jewelers Organization.

Independent Jewelers Organization: Master JewelerIJO prides itself as an organization focused on continuing education for its members in both Gemology and industry trends, which promotes consumer protection for you.

Ring Sizes

Engagement Ring Size

Not sure about your ring size? There is an easy way to determine your ring size.

Materials needed:

  • a piece of string
  • a marker
  • a ruler with mm or millimeter markings on it

Wrap the string around the largest part of your finger, this in most cases is the base of the finger in which you want to wear the ring, however in some cases this is the knuckle above where you want the ring. Mark the string where it meets on your finger and measure it with the ruler, make sure to measure it using the mm or millimeter settings.

Want to buy a ring as a gift and you are not sure of the size. Sneak a ring that you know fits and slide it over a tapered candle. follow the directions above and measure the candle where the ring stops on the candle.

Tip: finger sizes can change during the course of the day. To ensure the best fit measure your finger at the end of the day. Or measure a couple of times during the day and order your ring in the largest size that you measured.

Ring Size Inches Millimeter
1/2 15/32 11.95
1 31/64 12.37
1 1/2 1/2 12.78
2 33/64 13.21
2 1/2 17/32 13.61
3 35/64 14.05
3 1/2 9/16 14.45
4 37/64 14.86
4 1/2 19/32 15.27
5 5/8 15.7
5 1/2 41/64 16.1
6 21/32 16.51
6 1/2 43/64 16.92
7 11/16 17.35
7 1/2 45/64 17.75
8 23/32 18.19
8 1/2 47/64 18.53
9 3/4 18.89
9 1/2 49/64 19.41
10 25/32 19.84
10 1/2 51/64 20.2
11 13/16 20.68
11 1/2 53/64 21.08
12 27/32 21.49
12 1/2 55/64 21.89
13 7/8 22.33

Anniversary Gifts

Anniversary Gifts

Year Traditional Modern
1st Paper Clocks
2nd Cotton China
3rd Leather Crystal, Glass
4th Linen (Silk) Appliances
5th Wood Silverware
6th Iron Wood objects
7th Wool (Copper) Desk sets
8th Bronze Linens, Lace
9th Pottery (China) Leather goods
10th Tin, Aluminum Diamond
11th Steel Fashion jewelry
12th Silk Pearls, Colored gems
13th Lace Textiles, Furs
14th Ivory Gold jewelry
15th Crystal Watches
16th Silver holloware
17th Furniture
18th Porcelain
19th Bronze
20th China Platinum
21st Brass, Nickel
22nd Copper
23rd Silver plate
24th Musical instruments
25th Silver Sterling silver
26th Original pictures
27th Sculpture
28th Orchids
29th New furniture
30th Pearl Diamond
31st Timepieces
32nd Conveyances (e.g., automobiles)
33rd Amethyst
34th Opal
35th Coral (Jade) Jade
36th Bone china
37th Alabaster
38th Beryl, Tourmaline
39th Lace
40th Ruby Ruby
41st Land
42nd Improved real estate
43rd Travel
44th Groceries
45th Sapphire Sapphire
46th Original poetry tribute
47th Books
48th Optical goods (e.g., telescope, microscope)
49th Luxuries, any kind
50th Gold Gold
55th Emerald Emerald
60th Diamond Diamond
75th diamonds, diamond like stones, gold
80th Diamond, Pearl
85th Diamond, Sapphire
90th Diamond, Emerald
95th Diamond, Ruby
100th 10-carat Diamond

Man giving wife an Anniversary Gift

Birthstones

January — Garnet

GarnetThere are many myths and legends surrounding the garnet. One Biblical legend is that Noah hung this gem on the ark to light his way through the dark and stormy nights of God’s wrath. A Greek myth linked to the garnet is the story of the young goddess of sunshine, Persephone, who was abducted by Hades, god of the underworld. Hades eventually released Persephone, but not before he offered her some pomegranate seeds, which guaranteed her return to him.

First mined in Sri Lanka over 2,500 years ago, the garnet is also found in Africa, Australia, India, Russia, South America; and in the United States, in Arizona and Idaho. Although most commonly known as a red gemstone, the garnet comes in a variety of other hues, including muted yellows, vibrant oranges, rosy pinks, lime greens, and violets, a virtual bouquet of colors. This diversity is due to unique combinations of elements within each particular gem, such as iron, calcium, and manganese.

The garnet continues to be the protective gem of journeyers. A gift of garnet is thought to be symbolic of love and the desire for a loved one’s safe travel and speedy homecoming. It is January’s birthstone, but far from being only a winter gem, the garnet, with its brilliance and multitude of colors, is truly one for any season.

February — Amethyst

AmethystIf gazing into the sparkling purple depths of an Amethyst suffuses you with a sense of powerful well being, this is only to be expected. The ancient Greeks believed that this gemstone held many powers, among them protection against intoxication. In fact, the word Amethyst comes from the Greek word “amethystos,” meaning sober. In ancient Greece, the gemstone was associated with the god of wine, and it was common practice to serve this beverage from Amethyst goblets in the belief that this would prevent overindulgence. Even today, Amethyst is considered a stabilizing force for those struggling to overcome addictive behaviors.

February’s purple birthstone has been found among the possessions of royalty throughout the ages. The intense violet hue of Amethyst appealed to early monarchs, perhaps because they often wore this color. Purple dye was scarce and expensive at one time, and so it was reserved for the garments of kings and queens. Amethyst has been found in ruins dating as far back as the ninth century, adorning crowns, scepters, jewelry, and breastplates worn into battle. A large Amethyst is among the closely guarded gemstones in the British Crown Jewels.

March — Aquamarine

AquamarineThe name “Aquamarine,” the first birthstone for March, is derived from the Latin word for “aqua”- water, and “mare” – “sea.” It’s readily apparent why, because the color of this alluring gem mirrors the beautiful blue hues of the earth’s abundant waters. The first documented use of aquamarines is by the Greeks around 300 B.C., where aquamarine amulets were engraved with the god Poseidon on a chariot. Aquamarine beads have been found in the tombs of ancient Egyptians, another gem used to ensure safe passage through the next world. King Solomon’s breastplate is said to have contained an aquamarine gem. 2,000 years ago, Emperor Nero is said to have used the gem as an eyeglass and people believed the gem possessed medicinal and healing powers. In the Middle Ages, it was considered an antidote to poison and it has been used for telling fortunes.

April — Diamond

DiamondApril’s birthstone is remarkably simple in composition, yet stunning in its unique ability to reflect and refract light into vivid flashes of brilliant color. The ancient Hindus called the Diamond “Vajra,” meaning lightening, both because of the sparks of light thrown off by this gem as well as its invincible strength. The Diamond is harder than any other substance on earth.

Diamonds have been revered throughout history. Used to embellish such items as crowns, swords and emblems as well as jewelry, they’ve even been part of national holidays. Queen Victoria declared the celebration of her 50th year of reign a “Diamond Jubilee.” Diamonds have also been credited for having certain medicinal properties. During the middle ages, these gemstones were thought to heal illness, but only if the ailing person took the Diamond into bed to warm it up first!

A gift of a Diamond is symbolic of everlasting love. There is no more convincing a promise of an enduring relationship than the brilliant gemstone that has endured in people’s hearts throughout the ages.

May — Emerald

EmeraldEmerald comes in many shades of green, from a deep forest green to an insipid pale watery green. The most sought after are the rich velvety green colors. A characteristic of emeralds is that they tend to have inclusions in the stone. Inclusions are small specks which are found in precious stones. Every stone is unique and in emerald a perfect stone is extremely rare indeed. As early as 2000 BC, near the Red Sea in Egypt, the Cleopatra Mines were being worked. Emeralds were highly sought after by the Ancient Egyptians and also by the Incas. Fine emeralds come from Brazil and Columbia. Other places they have been found are Russia, Australia, Africa, Pakistan and India. A word of warning though to everyone who owns a piece of this beautiful stone, emeralds are treated with an oil which soaks into the stone and affords it protection. You have to be careful how you clean emeralds and don’t accidentally take out the protective oil. Do not ultrasonic clean emeralds and be careful with the baths of jewelry cleaner as these methods may strip the stones of their oils. Fidelity, goodness and love are associated with emerald. Emerald features in engagement and eternity rings, set together with diamonds. Emerald is the 55th wedding anniversary stone.

June — Pearl

PearlFrom one of the humblest of life forms, the mollusk, comes the pearl — a gem of unsurpassed beauty and elegance. Ancient civilizations had many stories to explain the origin of June’s birthstone, such as the Greek belief that pearls were the hardened tears of joy that the goddess of love shook from her eyes as she was born from the sea. According to Arab legend, pearls were formed when oysters were lured from the depths of the ocean by the beautiful moon and then swallowed moonlit dewdrops. And the Ancient Chinese thought that these gems originated from the brains of dragons.

Only those with royal status once wore pearl jewelry, but eventually these gems were seen among all classes of people. They continue to be viewed as a mark of taste and refinement as well as a symbol of purity, and they are often given to celebrate a marriage or the birth of a child. Pearls are nature’s perfect gift, suitable for all ages, and elegantly worn with everything from jeans to an evening gown.winter gem, the garnet, with its brilliance and multitude of colors, is truly one for any season.

July — Ruby

RubyLike a perfect red rose, the Ruby’s rich color speaks of love and passion. Called the “Rajnapura” or King of Gems by ancient Hindus, July’s birthstone is among the most highly prized of gems throughout history. The Ruby was considered to have magical powers, and was worn by royalty as a talisman against evil. It was thought to grow darker when peril was imminent, and to return to its original color once danger was past, provided it was in the hands of its rightful owner!

Rubies were thought to represent heat and power. Ancient tribes used the gem as bullets for blowguns, and it was said that a pot of water would boil instantly if a Ruby was tossed into it. Ground to powder and placed on the tongue, this crystal was used as a cure for indigestion.

It has been said that the Ruby’s red glow comes from an internal flame that cannot be extinguished, making a gift of this stone symbolic of everlasting love. With its hardness and durability, it is a perfect engagement gem. And if worn on the left hand, ancient lore has it that the Ruby will bring good fortune to its wearer, too!

August — Peridot

PeridotIf fire appears to leap from the vibrant green surface of the Peridot, this may be because this gem is formed as a result of volcanic activity. Many years ago, natives discovered Peridot crystals in the black sands of Hawaii, explaining their presence as tears shed by Pele, the volcano goddess. Throughout history, August’s birthstone has been used as a means to connect with nature. Early Egyptian priests drank a stimulating beverage called Soma from cups made of Peridot, believing this practice to draw them closer to Isis, the goddess of nature.

The name Peridot comes from the Arabic word “faridat,” meaning gem. Ancient Egyptians called them the “gem of the sun,” because of their dazzling brilliance when seen in the desert sun. It was believed that the Peridot glowed with light even as darkness fell, which is why miners were said to have scouted for these gems during the night, marking their location, and returning in the light of day to retrieve them. Perhaps this legendary mining method is the reason that the Peridot is sometimes called “evening emerald.”

The force of nature is alive within a Peridot, making a gift of this gemstone symbolic of vitality. It signifies strength, both individual and within a relationship, as well as the promise of new growth in years ahead.

September — Sapphire

SapphireThe striking deep blue of a quality sapphire is reminiscent of a cloudless night sky. Ancient civilizations believed that the world was set upon an enormous sapphire, which painted the sky blue with its reflection. This legend, as well as the belief that the ten commandments were inscribed upon tablets made of sapphire, gives September’s birthstone a royal place among gemstones.

Named after the Greek word “sapphirus”, meaning blue, Sapphires have long been a favorite among priests and kings, who considered them symbolic of wisdom and purity. These gemstones are prominent among the British Crown Jewels, and Prince Charles chose this as the engagement stone for his fiancé Princess Diana.

The Sapphire is second only to the Diamond in hardness, making it a durable gemstone for setting into jewelry. A gift of Sapphire represents sincerity and faithfulness. As nourishing to the soul as gazing up at the sky on a summer day, this brilliant blue gemstone is truly a heavenly choice!

October — Opal

OpalOctober’s birthstone treats the eye to an explosion of shimmering colors, not unlike those of a magnificent rainbow following a summer rain. The Opal derives its name from the Latin word “opalus,” meaning precious jewel. Prized for its unique ability to refract and reflect specific wavelengths of light, the Opal was called “Cupid Paederos” by the Romans, meaning a child beautiful as love. One legendary explanation for this gemstone’s origin is that it fell from heaven in a flash of fiery lightning.

Ancient monarchs treasured Opals, both for their beauty and for their presumed protective powers. They were set into crowns and worn in necklaces to ward off evil and to protect the eyesight. These gemstones were also ground and ingested for their healing properties and to ward off nightmares.

The Opal dates back to prehistoric times. It is a non-crystallized silica, which is a mineral found near the earth’s surface in areas where ancient geothermal hot springs once existed. As the hot springs dried up, layers of the silica, combined with water, were deposited into the cracks and cavities of the bedrock, forming Opal. This gemstone actually contains up to 30% water, so it must be protected from heat or harsh chemicals, both of which will cause drying and may lead to cracking and loss of iridescence. Opal must also be guarded from blows, since it is relatively soft and breaks easily.

November — Citrine

CitrineNovember’s gemstone, Citrine, is as warm as a Van Gogh painting of sunflowers. The name Citrine comes from an old French word, “citrin”, meaning lemon. One of the more rare forms of quartz, this gemstone ranges in color from the palest yellow to a dark amber named Madeira because of its resemblance to the red wine.

Perhaps because of its scarcity, there is little mention of Citrine used as a gemstone prior to the first century B.C. The Romans were thought to be the first to wear the yellow quartz, crafting it into cabochon, or highly polished but un-faceted cuts of stone set into jewelry. Citrine became more popular during the Romantic Period, when artisans often favored these warm colored gems to enhance gold jewelry. Citrine, like all forms of quartz, was believed to have magical powers and was worn as a talisman against evil thoughts and snake venom. It was also considered to have medicinal properties and was commonly used as a remedy for urinary and kidney ailments.

A gift of Citrine is symbolic for hope and strength. With its sunny brightness, this gemstone is ideal for helping anyone to get through the tough times in life!

December — Blue Topaz

Blue TopazAs cool and inviting as a blue lake on a blistering summer day, December’s birthstone is derived from the Sanskrit word “tapas,” meaning fire. This is because Blue Topaz was considered by ancient civilizations to have cooling properties. Not only was it believed to cool boiling water when thrown into the pot, but to calm hot tempers as well! This gemstone was credited with many other healing powers, among them the ability to cure insanity, asthma, weak vision and insomnia. The Blue Topaz was even thought to have magical properties in its ability to make its wearer invisible in a threatening situation.

Blue Topaz is the hardest of the silicate minerals. While pure Topaz is colorless, minor changes of elements within the stone result in a variety of other colors, such as blue, pale green, red, yellow and pink.

The blue hue is created when Topaz is heated, whether the heat source is natural or engineered by man. The three shades of Blue Topaz are Sky, Swiss and London Blue. The latter is the deepest blue and is often used as a less expensive substitute for Sapphire.

A gift of Blue Topaz is symbolic of love and fidelity. Luckily, this cool blue gemstone has no legendary power to put out the burning flame of love!

Diamond Buying Guide

Woman Holding DiamondsMany people are confused about how diamonds are priced. The best explanation is that asking for the price of a diamond is like asking for the price of a house. A real estate agent can’t quote you a price for a house without knowing its size, condition, location, etc. This process is the same one used when buying a diamond. A diamond’s beauty, rarity, and price depend on the interplay of all the 4Cs-cut, clarity, carat, and color.

The 4Cs are used throughout the world to classify the rarity of diamonds. Diamonds with the combination of the highest 4C ratings are more rare and, consequently, more expensive. No one C is more important than another in terms of beauty and it is important to note that each of the 4Cs will not diminish in value over time.

Once you have established those 4C characteristics that are most important to you, a jeweler can then begin to show you various options with quoted prices.

Carat

CaratRefers to the weight of a diamond.

Carat is often confused with size even though it is actually a measure of weight. One carat is equivalent to 200 milligrams. One carat can also be divided into 100 “points.” A .75 carat diamond is the same as a 75-points or 3/4 carat diamond.

A 1-carat diamond costs exactly twice the price of a half-carat diamond, right? Wrong. Since larger diamonds are found less frequently in nature, which places them at the rarest level of the Diamond Quality Pyramid, a 1-carat diamond will cost more than twice a 1/2-carat diamond (assuming color, clarity and cut remain constant).

Cut and mounting can make a diamond appear larger (or smaller) than its actual weight. So shop around and talk to your jeweler to find the right diamond and setting to optimize the beauty of your stone.

Clarity

ClarityRefers to the presence of inclusions in a diamond.

Inclusions are natural identifying characteristics such as minerals or fractures, appearing while diamonds are formed in the earth. They may look like tiny crystals, clouds or feathers.

To view inclusions, jewelers use a magnifying loupe. This tool allows jewelers to see a diamond at 10x its actual size so that inclusions are easier to see. The position of inclusions can affect the value of a diamond. There are very few flawless diamonds found in nature, thus these diamonds are much more valuable.

Inclusions are ranked on a scale of perfection, known as clarity, which was established by the Gemological Institute of America (GIA). The clarity scale, ranging from F (Flawless) to Included (I), is based on the visibility of inclusions at a magnification of 10x.

Some inclusions can be hidden by a mounting, thus having little effect on the beauty of a diamond. An inclusion in the middle or top of a diamond could impact the dispersion of light, sometimes making the diamond less brilliant.

The greater a diamond’s clarity, the more brilliant, valuable and rare it is-and the higher it is on the Diamond Quality Pyramid.

Color

ColorRefers to the degree to which a diamond is colorless.

Diamonds range in color from icy winter whites to warm summer whites. Diamonds are graded on a color scale established by the Gemological Institute of America (GIA) which ranges from D (colorless) to Z.

Warmer colored diamonds (K-Z) are particularly desirable when set in yellow gold. Icy winter whites (D-J) look stunning set in white gold or platinum.

Color differences are very subtle and it is very difficult to see the difference between, say, an E and an F. Therefore, colors are graded under controlled lighting conditions and are compared to a master set for accuracy.

Truly colorless stones, graded D, treasured for their rarity, are highest on the Diamond Quality Pyramid. Color, however, ultimately comes down to personal taste. Ask a jeweler to show you a variety of color grades next to one another to help you determine your color preference.

Cut

CutRefers to the angles and proportions of a diamond.

Based on scientific formulas, a well-cut diamond will internally reflect light from one mirror-like facet to another and disperse and reflect it through the top of the stone. This results in a display of brilliance and fire, thereby placing well-cut diamonds higher on the Diamond Quality Pyramid than deep or shallow-cut diamonds. Diamonds that are cut too deep or too shallow lose or leak light through the side or bottom, resulting in less brilliance and ultimately, value.

Cut also refers to shape-round, square, pear, or heart for example. Since a round diamond is symmetrical and capable of reflecting nearly all the light that enters, it is the most brilliant of all diamond shapes and follows specific proportional guidelines. Ask a jeweler to find out more about these guidelines.

Non-round shapes, also known as “fancy shapes,” will have their own guidelines to be considered well-cut.